PSNI Summer Road Safety

psni-motorcycle PSNI Launch Summer Road Safety Operation – Is This A Summer Of  Love And Responsibility?

The police have launched their summer road safety operation across the province and liaising closely with their, An Garda Síochána Traffic Corps colleagues in the border counties, specifically looking for road users taking unnecessary and potentially life-changing risks.

Assistant Chief Constable Alan Todd said about motorcycle safety, “With the better weather we are also particularly mindful of more motorcyclists taking to the roads, so we’re encouraging Bikers to ensure their motorcycles and safety equipment are in good working order, that they ride defensively and that if they haven’t already done so, consider booking a training session on our Bikesafe programme.

In addition, drivers need to be alert to the presence of motorcyclists using the road network, particularly when emerging from and turning into junctions.”

For all road users here is the whole message from the PSNI:

As police launch the latest in a series of summer road safety operations, the public are being warned to never drive after drinking or taking drugs, stop speeding, pay greater attention to the road and their surroundings and to leave their mobile phone alone, when driving, cycling or even crossing the road.

Assistant Chief Constable Alan Todd said, “With many people enjoying some time off over the coming months, we are appealing to all road users to exercise caution, as our statistics illustrate that, like any other holiday period, there is an increased risk of collisions.

“To date this year, 35 people have been killed on our roads, two more when compared to the same time last year. These are not simply frightening statistics, behind each fatality are families, friends and communities across Northern Ireland who are mourning the loss of a loved one. Considering that many, if not the majority of these deaths caused by collisions could have been avoided; it’s an appalling waste of life.

“Inattention, speeding, or more accurately, excessive speed for the conditions and drink or drug driving, are consistently the principal causes of the most serious road traffic collisions in which people are killed or seriously injured.

“Over the coming months, we will have police resources on the roads across Northern Ireland and will be liaising closely with our An Garda Síochána Traffic Corps colleagues in the border counties, specifically looking for road users taking unnecessary and potentially life-changing risks.

“With many school children and young people preparing to enjoy the holidays, road users should also keep an eye out for increased numbers of children using or crossing roads, particularly close to parks and leisure amenities, in addition to junctions and bus stops.

All road users must share the responsibility

“Pedestrians must pay attention to their environment, whether that means not getting distracted by friends or mobile devices, or being especially careful when walking on country roads by walking against the traffic flow and by wearing highly visible clothing.

“With the better weather we are also particularly mindful of more motorcyclists taking to the roads, so we’re encouraging Bikers to ensure their motorcycles and safety equipment are in good working order, that they ride defensively and that if they haven’t already done so, consider booking a training session on our Bikesafe programme. In addition, drivers need to be alert to the presence of motorcyclists using the road network, particularly when emerging from and turning into junctions.

“On a personal note, as a keen cyclist, I’ve witnessed some cyclists taking unnecessary risks. I would encourage cyclists to consider wearing a helmet, using front and rear lights and not listening to music players. At the same time, I’ve witnessed some drivers who have narrowly avoided injuring cyclists by driving too close, or through frustration, attempted downright dangerous overtaking manoeuvres putting themselves and others at huge risk. Drivers must be aware of cyclists, paying particular care at junctions, traffic lights, when opening vehicle doors after parking. Most importantly, drivers need to give cyclists enough room when overtaking.

“Police make no excuse for robustly enforcing the law to make Northern Ireland’s roads safer. All road users must share the responsibility to prevent deaths and injuries on our roads.

“All we ask is that drivers slow down, do not drive after drinking or taking drugs, wear a seatbelt, drive with greater care and attention and don’t use mobile phones while driving,” Assistant Chief Constable Todd concluded.

Original Source – PSNI – Click Here

Links & Information

Bikesafe – Northern Ireland – Click Here

Mobile Phone Scourge – Mark It! – Map It! – Click Here

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  1. Bob Craven says:

    We have seen all this before. Its annual.

    What is needed is a new approach and its not to do with speeding.

    It is to do with observation and perception and there are two current initiatives that fit that description. One is what you have reported is the NO SUPRISE NO ACCIDENT. Where we learn by rhyme of the dangers ahead. like A GAP IS A TRAP. This example can be used as a teaching aid and used to deter a motorcyclist from an overtake if they see just a gap in traffic beyond the vehicle to be overtaken and then commit. In the meantime that gap, being only a short or small distance, is filled and the biker has no where to go. It could also be used in town where traffic is stopped say at lights or due to other circumstance and a gap appears to have been left a few cars in front of a biker who wants to overtake or filter into that gap unaware that its a road junction and that another vehicle is emerging from it. The Campaign uses a number of rhyming sayings. that any road user could remember and look and consider before committing.

    There is another that can tie into that and that is the SPACE IS SAFE CAMPAIGN. This campaign runs separate to the first and aims to educate a driver as to the safer gap that they could give to the vehicle in front. It obviously is based on the Highway Code and section 126 which deals with the total stopping distances that are shown. So whilst it is speed relevant it concentrates more on the use of available space at relative speeds and the massive amount of advantages more space between vehicle will give not only to the driver but to all other road users.

    One of the spaces that is an accident waiting to happen is the overtaking position of a motorcycle.. Just recently the IAM came out in favour of not following a trainee when overtaking if it would mean that the assessor would need to exceed the legal limit for that road. In the past they have allowed any overtake and advised that the shorter ie. the faster the overtake then it was acceptable. Now it is not. Now we need to look at a motorcycle only a few feet behind another, say a HGV or large van. The overtake position does not exist in the Highway Code. indeed it would be contrary to the advise given of staying well back and giving the required safe distances. Its in the Police Manual and is taught at every lesson. WHY? It encourages a bad and dangerous position for others road users and can be responsible for some irresponsible overtakes. Lets face it if a motorcyclist, like a car driver, kept a Safe Distance as per the H.C.then they are some times less likely to attempt an overtake and that could save lives. If they did attempt an overtake they at least would have a greater and improved visibility of the situation ahead and also be able to sacrifice the overtake before coming side by side with the vehicle being overtaken due to any danger that wasn’t obvious before or one that has just shown itself. With distance one can make better observation before any overtake. If there is a good SAFE SPACE in front of the vehicle to be overtaken and not just A GAP then once committed the rider can be assured of a refuge after the overtake and not end up being hung out to dry on the wrong side of the road.

    The Space is Safe Campaign clearly gives information on how a driver or rider can readily asses their close proximity to other road users by using street furniture that is already there and assumes the adage that the greater that space the greater safety that space provides.. It does bring into question the old two second rule which is only acceptable at speeds up to 40 mph. and that it is less than the overall stopping distances at speeds above that. and dangerous to follow at speeds over 40 mph.